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Discussion Starter #1
I've had this car for 2 years, always though it had hydraulic steering, was considering getting the fluid replaced but I look under the hood and don't see PS fluid,

it's a 2012 1LS, does it have electric steering? If so I guess that's good for low maintenance but not so good that it can be probably hacked by the government with onstar.
 

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If I recall, and I'm recalling on my SS instead, the PS Fluid fill was under the plastic cover thing on top of the engine ... hidden away with the other stuff ... I could be wrong too
 

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Discussion Starter #3
didn't see it under the cover, the manual doesn't mention 1 word about it and the service advisor on the phone though it was electric, so I'm thinking it is.. its hard to tell by looking at it.
 

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didn't see it under the cover, the manual doesn't mention 1 word about it and the service advisor on the phone though it was electric, so I'm thinking it is.. its hard to tell by looking at it.
All 2010-2015 V6 Camaro models have hydraulic assist power steering.

After you remove the plastic engine cover, you should see the power steering reservoir located in front of the oil refill cap on the drivers side.

It has a black cap with a white 2-spoke steering wheel..
 

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From page 10-31 of your owners manual:

Power Steering Fluid
(Except ZL1)
The power steering fluid reservoir is
located under the engine cover on
the driver side toward the front of
the engine compartment. See
Engine Compartment Overview on
page 10‑6.
When to Check Power Steering
Fluid
It is not necessary to regularly
check power steering fluid unless
you suspect there is a leak in the
system or an unusual noise is
heard. A fluid loss in this system
could indicate a problem. Have the
system inspected and repaired.
How to Check Power Steering
Fluid
Notice: Extremely small amounts
of contamination can cause
steering system damage and
cause it to not work properly. Do
not allow contaminants to contact
the fluid side of the reservoir cap/
dipstick or to enter the reservoir.
Check the level after the vehicle has
been driven for at least 20 minutes
so the fluid is warm.

To check the power steering fluid:
1. Turn the ignition key to LOCK/
OFF and let the engine
compartment cool down.
2. Remove the engine cover. See
Engine Cover on page 10‑11.
3. Wipe the cap and the top of the
reservoir clean.
4. Turn the cap counterclockwise
and pull it straight up.
5. Wipe the dipstick with a
clean rag.
6. Replace the cap and completely
tighten it.
7. Remove the cap again and look
at the fluid level on the dipstick.

From page 11-12
Hydraulic Power Steering System GM Power Steering Fluid (GM Part No. U.S. 89020661, in
Canada 89021186).
 

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From page 10-31 of your owners manual:

Power Steering Fluid
(Except ZL1)
The power steering fluid reservoir is
located under the engine cover on
the driver side toward the front of
the engine compartment. See
Engine Compartment Overview on
page 10‑6.
When to Check Power Steering
Fluid
It is not necessary to regularly
check power steering fluid unless
you suspect there is a leak in the
system or an unusual noise is
heard. A fluid loss in this system
could indicate a problem. Have the
system inspected and repaired.
How to Check Power Steering
Fluid
Notice: Extremely small amounts
of contamination can cause
steering system damage and
cause it to not work properly. Do
not allow contaminants to contact
the fluid side of the reservoir cap/
dipstick or to enter the reservoir.
Check the level after the vehicle has
been driven for at least 20 minutes
so the fluid is warm.

To check the power steering fluid:
1. Turn the ignition key to LOCK/
OFF and let the engine
compartment cool down.
2. Remove the engine cover. See
Engine Cover on page 10‑11.
3. Wipe the cap and the top of the
reservoir clean.
4. Turn the cap counterclockwise
and pull it straight up.
5. Wipe the dipstick with a
clean rag.
6. Replace the cap and completely
tighten it.
7. Remove the cap again and look
at the fluid level on the dipstick.

From page 11-12
Hydraulic Power Steering System GM Power Steering Fluid (GM Part No. U.S. 89020661, in
Canada 89021186).
Way to go Chuck!!:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
well that kind of sucks, I was all happy becaue I thought I didn't have to worry about changing the fluid. that stuff does wear out right? Kind of strange it isn't recommended to change the fluid for maintenance
 

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well that kind of sucks, I was all happy becaue I thought I didn't have to worry about changing the fluid. that stuff does wear out right? Kind of strange it isn't recommended to change the fluid for maintenance
It is one of those "non critical" fluids that most don't ever change. There is no service "port" or the like to empty the rack and it is a PITA so it never gets done.

Do what I do and just empty the reservoir (I use a vacuum device called a Vacula) and refill with new fluid. It will get circulated in the with remaining stuff in the lines & rack. Rinse and repeat every 10-15k and you end up with "a fluid change".... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is one of those "non critical" fluids that most don't ever change. There is no service "port" or the like to empty the rack and it is a PITA so it never gets done.

Do what I do and just empty the reservoir (I use a vacuum device called a Vacula) and refill with new fluid. It will get circulated in the with remaining stuff in the lines & rack. Rinse and repeat every 10-15k and you end up with "a fluid change".... ;)
yes that Is what I used to do, I was afraid that it wasn't adequate, I'm sure the PS system will last longer with good fluid. it was definitely a common thing to go out on the 4th gen Camaros. I went through 2 pumps on my 2000 v6 in 100,000 miles. they would just start leaking & making noises after about 45k or so. I wasn't attentive to the fluid as I should have been.

thanks for the tip, I think that's what I'm going to do, not worth spending $90 to have this done.
 

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If it's not broke.... don't fix it....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
so what are the pros and cons electric or hydraulic......
hydraulic is more maintenance because the fluid should be replaced every few years, but the electric is bad because the government can hack it through onstar and crash your car if they don't like you.. like they did that Micheal Hastings, the rolling stone reporter that wrote articles exposing the NSA & CIA spying.

another reason manufacturers are going towards electric is because the driverless cars will soon be here..
 

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Realizing the age of this thread, the steering fluid is the same as the brake fluid. If it's still red in color, it's okay. Hydraulic fluid doesn't "wear out" like conventional oil, but it can be damaged by heat. If your fluid is turning dark towards brown, then it's time to change it.
 

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definitely a good idea to change your PS fluid, every 10,000 miles I drain the reservoir and put new fluid In like what's his name suggested.. the system works so much smoother soon as I do that. and every 5 years have the whole thing flushed.. I have a feeling the ps pump would be an expensive repair on these cars, smart to maintain it well.
 
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