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Seriously, I would rather have a well set up RWD vehicle for driving in the snow. I just feel I have way more control over a RWD vehicle in the snow than a FWD. With RWD I can steer with the throttle, once the tires start spinning on a FWD steering is nonexistent. Ultimatly, I'd prefer a nice 4X4 in the snow, but most of the time it would be RWD because I'm not going to "lock in the hubs" until the snow is up to the bumper.

Just ranting after three straight days of snow and my POS Buick Century.
 

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Really? I drove a FWD went I went anywhere in the mountains/snow. Seemed to work better for me.

WTF do I know, I am from Houston.
 

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This is precisely why I'm fixin to buy me a AWD car. :D

I also HATE FWD in the snow!

With RWD, if you're sliding, at least the car goes where you point it!

With FWD, if you're sliding, it doesn't matter what you do with the steering wheel, the car goes straight.

With AWD, you're not sliding. :D
 

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This is precisely why I'm fixin to buy me a AWD car. :D

I also HATE FWD in the snow!

With RWD, if you're sliding, at least the car goes where you point it!

With FWD, if you're sliding, it doesn't matter what you do with the steering wheel, the car goes straight.

With AWD, you're not sliding. :D
I hate to tell you that you are wrong...but you are wrong. I lived in NE Ohio for over 50 years and FWD cars worked WAY better than RWD in the snow. If you start to slide in a FWD car you MUST press on the gas and steer in the direction that you want to go. It is just that simple. If you slide in a RWD car you must take your foot off the gas and steer in the opposite direction that you are sliding, and be prepared to repeat this when your car slides the opposite way. In FWD you just press the gas and steer where you want the car to go and it will do just that. Works every time!
 

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I hate to tell you that you are wrong...but you are wrong. I lived in NE Ohio for over 50 years and FWD cars worked WAY better than RWD in the snow. If you start to slide in a FWD car you MUST press on the gas and steer in the direction that you want to go. It is just that simple. If you slide in a RWD car you must take your foot off the gas and steer in the opposite direction that you are sliding, and be prepared to repeat this when your car slides the opposite way. In FWD you just press the gas and steer where you want the car to go and it will do just that. Works every time!
FWD will only take you where you want to go if you have at least some traction. Most of the time you are going straight ahead no matter how you step on the gas. My Camaro with good snow tires is hands down the best 2 wheel drive I have ever driven. 60 years in Wisconsin.
 

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I hate to tell you that you are wrong...but you are wrong. I lived in NE Ohio for over 50 years and FWD cars worked WAY better than RWD in the snow. If you start to slide in a FWD car you MUST press on the gas and steer in the direction that you want to go. It is just that simple. If you slide in a RWD car you must take your foot off the gas and steer in the opposite direction that you are sliding, and be prepared to repeat this when your car slides the opposite way. In FWD you just press the gas and steer where you want the car to go and it will do just that. Works every time!
I've lived in NE Ohio all my life (46 years), learned to drive during Ohio winters and my experience is just the opposite. If traction is compromised enough to bring the back end of a FWD car around hitting the gas is only going to break the front (steering) tires loose and then you have zero control. You are correct in saying that completely lifting off the throttle in a RWD car in the same situation will cause the back end of the car to snap back in the opposite direction requiring counter correction. However if you gradually feather the throttle back the car will straighten out and follow the direction of the front wheels without the need for counter correction. At most some slight counter correction will be needed, but with practice it won't.

What I was told (mostly by local police) in my youth was "fooling around" or "hot rodding" in snow covered parking lots (and country back roads) has served as invaluable experiences in real world situations.
 

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I hate to tell you that you are wrong...but you are wrong. I lived in NE Ohio for over 50 years and FWD cars worked WAY better than RWD in the snow. If you start to slide in a FWD car you MUST press on the gas and steer in the direction that you want to go. It is just that simple. If you slide in a RWD car you must take your foot off the gas and steer in the opposite direction that you are sliding, and be prepared to repeat this when your car slides the opposite way. In FWD you just press the gas and steer where you want the car to go and it will do just that. Works every time!
I would agree. I've owned both RWD and FWD drive cars and I have found that FWD works better in the snow. Just point the wheels where you want to go use the throttle accordingly. Plus if you're in need of a tighter turn, you pull on the e-brake handle and kick the back end out. The e-brake thing scares the crap out of passengers who aren't expecting it so that's an added bonus. ;)
 

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FWD will only take you where you want to go if you have at least some traction. Most of the time you are going straight ahead no matter how you step on the gas. My Camaro with good snow tires is hands down the best 2 wheel drive I have ever driven. 60 years in Wisconsin.
The engine sits over the front wheels...how much weight do you need man? I drove many many front wheel drive cars and unless you are on bald tires you can control the FWD cars much better in the snow. No offense but I think some people need to take lessons on how to drive a FWD car in the snow. It is so easy, never take your foot off of the gas. I am not saying stomp it but keep pressure on the pedal and STEER where you want to go. That is why Detroit made them in the first place. They didn't have all of the latest technogoly of traction control back in the eighties when they first came out but they drove where you wanted them to go. Now they are even better.
 

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I've lived in NE Ohio all my life (46 years), learned to drive during Ohio winters and my experience is just the opposite. If traction is compromised enough to bring the back end of a FWD car around hitting the gas is only going to break the front (steering) tires loose and then you have zero control. You are correct in saying that completely lifting off the throttle in a RWD car in the same situation will cause the back end of the car to snap back in the opposite direction requiring counter correction. However if you gradually feather the throttle back the car will straighten out and follow the direction of the front wheels without the need for counter correction. At most some slight counter correction will be needed, but with practice it won't.

What I was told (mostly by local police) in my youth was "fooling around" or "hot rodding" in snow covered parking lots (and country back roads) has served as invaluable experiences in real world situations.

I grew up in Howland Ohio, near Warren and we had plenty of snow to drive in. I started out with a 1968 Pontiac LeMans, then a brand new Z28 in 1973, both rear wheel drive vehicles. I did all the parking lot craziness and learned a lot to get me out of real life situations. When I started driving FWD cars in 1980 it was a whole lot easier to drive in snow. You learn the gas and steer where you want trick instead of the opposite (steer in the opposite direction of your slide as in RWD cars) and it was amazingly easier. I never ever spun a FWD car as I have RWD cars. I once drove my brothers 1970 Chevelle backwards down the road between several trees in someones lawn and back out on the road without hitting anything after the back end got away from me with RWD.
The second you start to slide in FWD, hit the gas and steer where you want and you will never get into trouble. BTW, I'm 57.
 

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im kinda up in the air about awd with dry roads my fiances cts4 drives odd with it kinda feels like tq steer but in the snow its been alota fun...my dually has been alot of fun in the 4-5 foot snow drifts
 

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I live in Chardon Ohio, in the heart of the snow belt. The city's website has snow fall on it. lol

Weekly in the winter I drive around RWD vehicles that are stuck. Most even with snow tires. I can not tell you how often I see RWD vehicles crawling up a hill, and I'm having no problem at all with my FWD.

Most of you sound like you do not know how to drive a FWD vehicle in the snow, or are on bald tires.
 

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I live in Chardon Ohio, in the heart of the snow belt. The city's website has snow fall on it. lol

Weekly in the winter I drive around RWD vehicles that are stuck. Most even with snow tires. I can not tell you how often I see RWD vehicles crawling up a hill, and I'm having no problem at all with my FWD.

Most of you sound like you do not know how to drive a FWD vehicle in the snow, or are on bald tires.
EXACTLY!!! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The engine sits over the front wheels...how much weight do you need man? I drove many many front wheel drive cars and unless you are on bald tires you can control the FWD cars much better in the snow. No offense but I think some people need to take lessons on how to drive a FWD car in the snow. It is so easy, never take your foot off of the gas. I am not saying stomp it but keep pressure on the pedal and STEER where you want to go. That is why Detroit made them in the first place. They didn't have all of the latest technogoly of traction control back in the eighties when they first came out but they drove where you wanted them to go. Now they are even better.
There were two reasons that American auto makers adopted FWD from the European auto makers... Reduced cost in manufacturing by placing the entire drivetrain in one sub assembly and reduced weight for improved fuel economy. They used "safety" to sell the whole mess to the public.

Traction control, ABS, self braking, blind spot warning, self parking, and the entire host of driver aids on vehicles today serve only one purpose... to allow people with inadequate driving skills to commute from point A to point B without killing someone.

Anyone paying attention will notice the subject line for this thread is "I HATE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE IN THE SNOW!" not "Rear wheel drive is the best in the snow".

I guess its just that I like to drive a car, not just ride along behind the steering wheel.
 
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