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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The LLT & LFX have oil consumption and crankcase evacuation issues that I have covered in other threads, but here is an example of how critical it is to do the drill mod the PCV barb located in the rear of the passenger side cam/valve cover. The holes are far to small from the factory until late 2013-2014 where GM changed the size to a proper CFM of flow and prevents the issues going forward. (only took the past 3-4 years to get it this far as many know how I have pushed this). Here is a few year old one that shows what happens, and if the crankcase cannot evacuate properly all the damaging combustion byproducts will accumulate in the crankcase greatly shortening engine life.

The proper drill size is 7/64" the top single, and 5/64" bottom 2 holes need this drilled:




If you have one of the systems that dletes the PCV systems function and ties the clean and dirty sides together, you will see excess condesation and possible damage to catalytic converters or piston/rod damage from the ingestion of "gulps" of water as it fills the can and "burps" it into the intake air pipe.

Ask for more info on anything related to proper PCV/Crankcase evacuation on both V8's and V6's.

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Shouldn't there be a bulletin on this or a recall to get this fixed? I have a 2011 2LT and do not want to experience issues like this later on since the car only has 15k miles on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This has been this way since the first GEn 3.6L non DI LY7 came out in 2003-2004. From 2008 on the 3.6LLT in other GM platforms already had the engine, Camaro has the LLT in 2010-2011 and the LFX 2012-2014.

Every PCV system has several functions, most not under stood or misunderstood. Most only look at the obvious, releasing crankcase pressure. But far more important long term is the constant evacuation of the combustion byproducts that will cause accelerated engine wear/damage if not constantly evacuated, or "flushed" from the crankcase while these are still in a suspended or gaseous state. If not, they condense and fall to the engine oil and coat internal engine parts when you shut down and the engine cools. So any shop/company/person that just defeats the PCV system with breathers, or breathered catchcans the engine will not live nearly as long (unless they change oil after every outing to remove these compounds) as one that has proper crankcase evacuation.

These include (will only list the most damaging as there are a ton):

Unburnt fuel: that contaminates the the oil diluting it and reducing it's ability to protect.

Water vapor: Also dlutes the engine oil and causes corrosion of internal engine parts. Many see this as a milky sludge under the oil fill cap, but when you see this...damage has already begun.

Sulfuric Acid: After this reaches a certain PPM of concentration, it attacks all metal in the engine. The most visible is the discoloration of the drivers side valve cover underneath on a LS3 V8 vs the passenger side that stays flushed, most common internal damage is the acid attacking the bearing surfaces and crank and cam journals. Seen as tiny pits on the journals, and etched "blotches" or "worm tracks" on the bearing surfaces.

Abrasive carbon particles:

The larger ones the oil filter medium will catch, but the smaller ones pass right through and are constantly accumulating in the engine oil and accelerating wear.

How this is prevented by the PCV system is as follows:

LLT & LFX V6:

Clean, filtered and MAF metered (measured) fresh air enters the rear of the drivers side cam/valve cover from the main intake air tube where it passes the valve train, travels down into the main portion of the crankcase, all the while "flushing" or evacuating these compounds while still in suspension, up the passenger side, past the valve train, and out the rear of the passenger side valve cover through the fixed orifice as shown in the pictures, which is them drawn into the intake manifold using the vacuum present to keep these constantly drawn out and out of the crankcase before they can accumulate and cause damage. Then the majority of these are burned harmlessly in the combustion process and further in the catalytic converter.

The issue most auto manufacturers face is the oil mist that is drawn through with this and causes the oil ingestion issues many experience, but they can be trapped by a properly functioning catchcan like the Elite, SMC, RX and a couple others (most let a good amount of oil to pull right through and are not worth installing). The issues is to try and slow this oil ingestion, the manufacturers (GM specifically in this example, but most experience this) is the standard PCV valve has been replaced with these fixed orifices to slow the flow through. This slows oil ingestion, but the small size of the orifice (drivers side rear of valve cover in L((, valley cover in LS3, and passenger side valley cover in V6) allows deposits to form and clog these over time resulting in NO evacuation, and crankcase pressure backing up through the clean side (fresh) into the main intake air tube. On a modified engine, seal leaks and failures can occur, and all the damaging compounds will collect in and accumulate in the crankcase and engine oil. We have been posting on forums how to modify these to prevent this. The V6 the proper size to drill to is 5/64" both the top and bottom two (GM finally started with revised orifices mid-late 2013 and on to correct this, and no, there are no recalls. May be a TSB or two, but I have shared this with GM engineers for over 3 years on how easy of a change this is to correct....took that long to implement).

On the L99, it is in the rear of the drivers side valve cover barb and 1/8" will allow proper CFM of flow to properly evacuate, and the LS3 it is located in the valley cover barb and 1/8" is the size needed, but we prefer to always evac on any of the V8's from the drivers side barb as the valley cover leaves the entire drivers side bank stagnant allowing the acid to attack the rocker pivot needle bearings and races.

So, this is an easy DIY for those wanting to avoid or correct this, as is the addition of one of the few oil separating catchcans that actually catch most or all the oil from causing the intake valve coking issues:

To do this mod, simply unhook the black plastic fitting from the barb by pushing aside the release tab, grab the base of the barb firmly with a plyers or vice grips, twist to break seal and pull straight up taking care not to break the plastic cam cover. Drill the top one and bottom two holes to 5/16" and then blow debris clear of barb, re install making sure to firmly seat the barb back in, reconnect the plastic fitting and your good to go.

Here are some more threads on the subject, and also, ANYONE with a defeated PCV system such as open breathers, open lines hanging down, a catchcan with both the dirty and clean sides run together into it and the intake manifold vacuum port plugged, or a vented catchcan (breather on top) you are slowly killing your engine prematurely, not matter how well you trust whoever did this. And any with a catchcan like described where the clean and dirty side are run together and then vented into the main intake air tube, the least you will see is damaged cat converters and unexplained misfires, the worst is bent rods and broken pistons from the water being ingested in a "gulp" as it burps from the can:



http://www.moderncamaro.com/forum/general-technical-discussion/52026-understanding-intake-valve-coking-di-engines.html

http://www.moderncamaro.com/forum/general-technical-discussion/52018-understanding-causes-oil-consumption-todays-modern-engines.html

And I had a DIY on manually cleaning the intake valves but that seems to have gotten deleted..let me post that again.

Any questions or clarification, just ask.

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Discussion Starter #5
Here are some more pics and info:




Remove the PCV fixed orifice barb and drill it to 5/64" both top and bottom and this will go away. Here is what they look like when they clog, and they dont sell them separate from the valve cover:




This prevents the crankcase from evacuating and all the damaging combustion byproducts are accumulating (along with moisture/water) in the crankcase. Pressure will drive some into the main clean-side air intake tube.

Here is a cam cover with the mod done:


And not done:


And removed to drill:




And of course what your intake valves most likely look like if not using a good catchcan:

 

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Is it easy to get to the rear of the passenger side cam/valve cover? And is this something GM would correct if I was to bring it into the shop?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Easy to do yourself.....follow the black hard plastic line from the center of the intake manifold to the PCV barb and you can release the fitting that attaches it by pushing th e small plastic tab over that is molded into the fitting to release and it pops right off. Then use a plyers to grip it at the bottom (you will see the ridge) and twist and pull straight up.

GM is well aware as they made the changes going forward from mid-late 2013 and up, but techs at the dealers will not have any knowledge on it and don't expect them to incur the added cost to train and do as most are never aware of most issues (ALL manufacturers, not just GM) and as time passes it becomes someone else s problem.

Same as the oil ingestion issues. This is an easy mod to do though, just take your time and be careful when drilling, then blow out any debris after doing it, then re-insert firmly and reconnect and your all good.

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Discussion Starter #8
Drill the top hole to 7/64's, and the two bottom ones 5/64's.

Here is what the 2014's look like in comparison:


Only took them 4 years to implement the change after posting this mod and sharing the cause and solution.
 

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I will be doing this when I tear my engine down. I might even add a second valve and fresh air breather while I'm at it just incase.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Fresh air breather will break the system...you will need to do this and add secondary evacuation source for in-boost operation. If you need details ask, I'll guide you through it.

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I have a question the I think is semi-related to this thread ... with catch cans there are also sold the breather / filter things that replace the oil fill cap ... what do these do? and does it make a difference for a V6 versus a V8?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have a question the I think is semi-related to this thread ... with catch cans there are also sold the breather / filter things that replace the oil fill cap ... what do these do? and does it make a difference for a V6 versus a V8?
Sorry for the late reply.

A breather that is unrestricted will allow un-metered air into the system and mess with your fuel trims. I recommend a flow controlled breather or a 1LE style cleanside separator that maintains 100% metered air

Where are you at? I might stop by with the turd once I get it up and running.





PS: Your =/= you're
Palmetto between Tampa and Sarasota just off I-75.

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A breather that is unrestricted will allow un-metered air into the system and mess with your fuel trims. I recommend a flow controlled breather or a 1LE style cleanside separator that maintains 100% metered air




My question is similar to 83Hokie's:
I believe the breather that came with the RX catch can is of the "metered" type. If this is correct, is drilling the oriface still necessary? (for the LLT)
 

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That is really my question as well (I think) the breather I got with my RX catch can replaces the oil cap and has a filter on the end ... doesn't look like it plugs into anything ... metered or unmetered?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
A breather that is unrestricted will allow un-metered air into the system and mess with your fuel trims. I recommend a flow controlled breather or a 1LE style cleanside separator that maintains 100% metered air

My question is similar to 83Hokie's:
I believe the breather that came with the RX catch can is of the "metered" type. If this is correct, is drilling the oriface still necessary? (for the LLT)
Yes, orifice drill mod is critical as it cannot flow the proper CFM to prevent pressure building in the crankcase and then back flowing out the cleanside. If your using the RX checkvalved breather it will not allow venting (and yes, the breather controls the amount entering to fall within acceptable fuel trim parameters, but it is NOT metered by the MAF. )

The RX 1LE style does retain 100% metered air:


This allows oil separation and retains 100% MAF metered air and is emissions compliant. (the best solution).

That is really my question as well (I think) the breather I got with my RX catch can replaces the oil cap and has a filter on the end ... doesn't look like it plugs into anything ... metered or unmetered?
You have the standard breather that has been used for the past 12 plus years. The new 1LE style is an improvement over that.

Again, PCV barb drill mod is critical to do. If you know someone with a 2014 pop off the fitting and see how much bigger it is now.

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I pulled the PCV barb out to drill and noticed what looked like some red loctite around the collar that goes into the cam cover. Should there be something applied when reinstalling it?
 
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