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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys, I haven't been around much... been insanely busy working 10 hours a day six days a week. Anyway I'm anxiously awaiting the appearance of the new Camaro on local streets... even though I won't be able to afford one anytime soon. One thing I have been able to make time for is honing my photography skills. Check out my latest series and let me know what you think...


"Machine Shop Series - Photo #3


"Machine Shop Series - Photo #4"


"Machine Shop Series - Photo #5


"Machine Shop Series - Photo #6


"Machine Shop Series - Photo #7

Full size images and the rest of the series can be viewed in my "Machine Shop" gallery.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Those are some really great pictures. The Composition is great in each photo. I'm trying to get into photography, what camera are you using?
Thanks for the compliments.

Right now I'm shooting with a lowly Canon SX100IS (Glorified point and shoot) while I save up my pennies for a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSi.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #6
lol. I am also planning on getting a Digital Rebel XSi or a Nikon D50/60/80 or 90. Right now, I am using my Vivitar 7410, and It sucks.
I haven't heard to many good things about the Nikons from people that use them... The reputation that Nikon built with their SLR cameras of years past hasn't translated well to DSLR cameras. Nikon lenses are still among the finest in the world, but the DSLRs lack in user interface and processing capabilities. If you need an affordable alternative to the Canon look into Sony DSLRs (Minolta technology). I've used a Sony A300 and it is very capable but it still doesn't match the Canon for user interface.

great pics, i like the lighting used in them.
thanks for the comment
 

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Those are excellent photos. I have a question though:

What kind of lathes are those, they look like the ANILAMS we have in the MMC here at Purdue.

Looks like those lathes have had some abuse on them and the same goes for that carbide. The lathes look like more than one person has hit it with a chamfer tool or tool steel taken some material off, also that carbide looks like its got a bit of galling. What's being machined in the picture?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Those are excellent photos. I have a question though:

What kind of lathes are those, they look like the ANILAMS we have in the MMC here at Purdue.

Looks like those lathes have had some abuse on them and the same goes for that carbide. The lathes look like more than one person has hit it with a chamfer tool or tool steel taken some material off, also that carbide looks like its got a bit of galling. What's being machined in the picture?
Its a Mori Seiki manual lathe that I believe was originally use as an anchor on the Mayflower... Seriously, its a very used manual lathe with gear driven auto feed and threading capabilities. It has its share of battle scars but it still gets the job done. The material in the photos is lead, but I believe the insert was last used to turn Stainless.
 

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Its a Mori Seiki manual lathe that I believe was originally use as an anchor on the Mayflower... Seriously, its a very used manual lathe with gear driven auto feed and threading capabilities. It has its share of battle scars but it still gets the job done. The material in the photos is lead, but I believe the insert was last used to turn Stainless.
Lol. That must be a nice feature to have that its a manual lathe with threading capabilities. Our lathes are similar, but anything under I think .75" we have to thread by hand. I had 20 control arm jig bolts to machine one day and had to tap each one of them for UNF 10-32 thread by hand. Each bolt was about 5/8" long and made out of steel. I wish we could power tap, but from what I hear its really dangerous and only can be done by the very experienced.

But that ain't nothing compared to what happened to the grad student who got kicked out of the shop. He broke 6 tooling inserts in under 3 mins. Turned out the guy was trying to machine a material that had a Rockwell hardness of 62 (a hammer has a RH of about 33).
 

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Hrmm I kinda like my D90...





I need to get some more free time to use it tho. All I've been doing is working and going to school.
 
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