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Yesterday on the way home i needed gas stoped at the neerest station no super or mid grade went to the next no super clerk said they may not get any more super no one is buying it . This made me think what if none of these store /stations stop getting super or even mid grade? Does any think the new CAMARO will run on mid grade? Ihave run my 02 z on mid grade on the highway .
 

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Are you in the middle of nowhere?
Don't be an ass to him. The obvious answer to his question is no, they are not usin it. My mother has an Infinity g35, and was recommended to use Super, or at least Mid-grade fuel. With the price of gas as high as it is, the last time Mid-Grade was put in that car was likely last November.

But, interestingly, she called the LExus service department about the Lexus IS 250, which she was hesitant to look at due to its also having Premium gasoline recommended, and the head of the service department said that aside from a very minor performance decrease, no problems would occur. He actually said that he always fills up the cars at the dealership with regular fuel.
 

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Usually it's ok to use lower grade fuel, you just lose a little bit of power.

But I'd be hesitant to use low-grade in a factory boosted application though (like a Grand Prix GTP, Cobalt SS, Solstice GXP, etc etc) unless it is recommended by the manufacturer.
 

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My in-laws have a 92 Bonneville SSEI, which is supposed to take premium. A while ago, my father-in-law (cheap!) started putting in regular, and they have had more problems with that thing ever since that point than they had in the years leading up to now.

Granted, it is absolutely ancient now.
 

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My in-laws have a 92 Bonneville SSEI, which is supposed to take premium. A while ago, my father-in-law (cheap!) started putting in regular, and they have had more problems with that thing ever since that point than they had in the years leading up to now.

Granted, it is absolutely ancient now.
And it's a '92 Bonneville.... :D
 

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But, interestingly, she called the LExus service department about the Lexus IS 250, which she was hesitant to look at due to its also having Premium gasoline recommended, and the head of the service department said that aside from a very minor performance decrease, no problems would occur. He actually said that he always fills up the cars at the dealership with regular fuel.

Then he is a service department I want no part of. He obviously does not know what can happen with predetonation. Sure cars retard the timing with low octane fuel but it is after the knock sensors ave ALREADY detected a knock not before. There is no way for the PCM to tell if lower octane is used until after it has already predetonated. Floor a car designed to use premium with 87 octane and not only will you notice a decreased performance but you should also hear the pinging right before the timing is taken out. Get a 93 octane tune (a la bama Tunes for mustangs and put 87 and you will hear it) It is not quite as bad with 87 in a 91 but put 87 in a 93 tune and you will hear it no matter what under certain conditions. It can't pull enough timing.

For instance my work which has a fleet of vehicles and uses alot of fuel buys 84 octane fuel in bulk. On our Colorados designed to use a minimum of 87 they sound like diesels when the engine is loaded to 2K RPM's. It cannot pull enough timing to compensate. Try to back up a slight hill and it makes more racket than a 70 John deere with a rod knocking. There is no way those vehicles can make it to 50K miles and none have yet. If it says xx recommended put it in trust me there is a reason. Your bearings will love you for it. Alot more so in boosted applications. Predetonation beats the bearings, and as in the owners manual "can and will cause premature engine failure". That phrase I know is in both my Camaro and GTO's owners manuals.
 

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around here gas is at 4.35 for regular but we've never had 93 octane here. 87 is regular, 89 is plua, and 91 is premium, I dont see 93 anywhere. But a sunoco a few miles away does sell 110 from the pump
 

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When I hear people say "with gas prices the way they are I wont dare dish out for premium" ...I just dont get it...

Math people..Do most people not realize it would cost you 5 dollars more TOPS to bump to premium and has been quoted to increase mpg? I just dont understand why some people would dish out for a camaro, challenger, or hell even mustang...and not want to put the best **** thing in their vehicle?
 

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When I hear people say "with gas prices the way they are I wont dare dish out for premium" ...I just dont get it...

Math people..Do most people not realize it would cost you 5 dollars more TOPS to bump to premium and has been quoted to increase mpg? I just dont understand why some people would dish out for a camaro, challenger, or hell even mustang...and not want to put the best **** thing in their vehicle?

Well, since I'm the one who said in this thread 'with gas prices the way they are' I will take it upon myself to be the one to answer you, regardless of the fact that I drive a V6 Mustang and want only a V6 Camaro. First of all, higher octane fuel does not increase miles per gallon in your car. The closest thing to that even being true is that if your engine is tuned to use a higher octane fuel, it will - over time - get damaged from using lower octane fuel and thus reduce fuel efficiency.

However, you want the people who are, in your mind, being cheap on gasoline prices to do the math and recognize that higher octane fuel would only cost, in your statement, $5 more than regular. Well, I would like you to do the real math, though not with any specific numbers. Consider that gasoline is used not only in your personal car, but also the car that brings the goods to your local publix. Well, the gasoline prices are increasing, and the suppliers are not going to want to earn any less money, so they had a higher gas surcharge onto the super market for their orders. Well, I can assure you Publix does not wish to make any less money, so their prices are going to go up to reflect the further charge on them. At the same time, your personal income isn't changing, because all firms are feeling the effects of oil spread out through them and costs are increasing on them. So, you, as both a consumer and a worker for one of these firms have less disposable income on which you can spend for luxury items. Is gasoline for a higher octane really worth you not going out to eat that one night a week that you normally do?

Which leads me into a further example, because honestly I'm a little peeved at what I percieved as an attack on the logic of my statement before. My parents own a small Italian restaurant in Ormond Beach (which is north of Daytona). The aforementioned gas surcharge is also charged on their restaurant by our suppliers. Not only that, but the suppliers are also enforcing a minimum order value due to the increasing price of gasoline. So, this causes the restaurant's costs to heighten. The obvious recourse is to increase prices, right? Well, with business already down, an increase i nthe price of the restaurant's food would likely lead to a further drop of customers. Customers to not come unconditionally, because theyare the same consumers paying more at the supermarket and gas pump as well. Therefore, the restaurant - and by ownership, my parents - have less disposable income than they are used to.

But, by all means, chastise the people who don't wish tospend an extra $5 at the gas pump, which according to math become $260 on a year, if you only fill up once a week. You can still go and fill up with premium gas, but most people are just trying to hold onto their slice of the American dream by cutting corners here and there.
 

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It's probably more like $3 more a tank for super...I don't see it as a big deal. You're spending $60+ to fill your tank, what's an extra $3 if it makes your car run better? If the manufacturer recommends super, in most cases, I would think the car will run better (and more efficient) on super in the long run. That said, I don't understand the people who insist on putting super in cars that don't require it.

For people who are REALLY concerned, you could always get a PCM tune for better MPG and lower octane gas.
 

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Your engine knows the octane it needs and will tell you.

Now, using the proper octane gasoline can actually increase your mpg, depending on your situation. With the anti-knock action going on, the computer will back off timing so you can run the cheaper stuff and not kill your engine-- much. But, this COULD affect your mpg, albeit slightly, I would imagine as the car isn't running to optimum tune.

Also, the proportion to the expense of premium vs. regular, if dictated by your engine needs, is dirt cheap compared to just a couple of years ago. Around here, you can get premium for 20 cents/gallon more. On a 16 gallon tank, that's 3.20 more MAX for premium. If your car only needed mid-grade, then you're talking 1.60. Either way, that's less than the cost of one Starbucks anything and definitely less than an extra gallon of gas.

Just because they have or don't have premium doesn't mean you absolutely need it, though. Normally, following the manufacturer's recommendations will get you right where you need to be. With that said, anyone that runs a car on regular but the car requires premium to run right is certainly asking for trouble down the road and is, IMO, crazy for doing so. If you can't afford to run the right fuel in it, then trade it in for an econo-box.

Of course, even if you don't need it, if it gives you a warm fuzzy, it never hurts to use premium.
 

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Don't be an ass to him.
I was simply asking because I could not imagine that happening in a metro-area.

Nonetheless, as has been pointed out, the difference it's really going to make at each fill up is chump change. Everyone is hyping it up and it's just as annoying as getting this "green" stuff shoved down our throats. If you don't want to run premium in a vehicle that requires it, then don't. Just don't get rid of the gas for those of us who do.
 

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Does any think the new CAMARO will run on mid grade?
Not for sure. But the smart money would be on yes.

The G8 GT, CTS (Direct Injected), and Corvette can all run on mid-grade and lower. If the Camaro requires anything above 89...I'd be surprised.
 

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Not for sure. But the smart money would be on yes.

The G8 GT, CTS (Direct Injected), and Corvette can all run on mid-grade and lower. If the Camaro requires anything above 89...I'd be surprised.
Emphasis on can. As has been mentioned, premium fuel is recommended for full performance. You want to use all 300hp out of that DI V6? Then you'll have to run premium. Same goes for the 6.2 in both the G8 and Corvette. Even the 2.4 Ecotec needs premium to get all 174hp out of it.
 

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There is no way my minicooper clubmanS is going to be using regular fuel. It's about performance! Man I love that little car.:D They gave me a John Cooper Works mini as a loaner a few weeks ago and wow! Very nimble and quick.
 

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Don't be an ass to him. The obvious answer to his question is no, they are not usin it. My mother has an Infinity g35, and was recommended to use Super, or at least Mid-grade fuel. With the price of gas as high as it is, the last time Mid-Grade was put in that car was likely last November.

But, interestingly, she called the LExus service department about the Lexus IS 250, which she was hesitant to look at due to its also having Premium gasoline recommended, and the head of the service department said that aside from a very minor performance decrease, no problems would occur. He actually said that he always fills up the cars at the dealership with regular fuel.
Tell your mom to stop being cheap. If she's driving a G, tell her to take care of it.

Also, that's exactly why I don't trust everything a dealer says. A lot of people don't know what the effff they're talking about.

Also, the OP must live in the middle of no where if that's happening. I couldn't imagine something like that happening here in SoCal.
 
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