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Haven't seen anything going that far yet. All I've seen is that they are looking to release some rules tomorrow that would essentially bump up the existing deadline to hit 35 mpg avg by 2020 to 2016. That'll be tougher on V8's but won't kill them.

Chris
 

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oh stop. whoever told you that should have his mouth duct-taped shut. There was a thread from last month on C5 about this...the date of the 1st post...4/1/09.:rolleyes:

:STFU: :thread:

BTW: Obama used to drive a hemi powered 300M.
 

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oh stop. whoever told you that should have his mouth duct-taped shut. There was a thread from last month on C5 about this...the date of the 1st post...4/1/09.:rolleyes:

:STFU: :thread:

BTW: Obama used to drive a hemi powered 300M.
:agree:
 

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I smell bullsh:t
 

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hahah

so will this even affect me?
since i live in california
Seriously, if the fleet average is at 35 mpg in CA then I'll be a monkey's uncle. There's probably more gas guzzling crap on the roads in CA than anywhere else in this country... Save for the highest number of Prius's and Smart Cars per square mile in the San Francisco area.

Let's keep the smug clouds over here for your guys' sake.
 

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I'm not happy about it, but here is the story.

http://www.detnews.com/article/20090518/AUTO01/905180403/White-House-to-require-35.5-mpg-by-2016


Monday, May 18, 2009
White House to require 35.5 mpg by 2016

David Shepardson / Detroit News Washington Bureau

Washington -- The Obama administration will unveil national tailpipe emissions standards and mileage requirements Tuesday, which will force automakers to dramatically boost the efficiency of vehicles by 2016 to a fleet-wide average of 35.5 mpg, but give them a single national standard.

Under a compromise, California and 13 other states' efforts to impose a 30 percent reduction in tailpipe emissions are to be approved and extended to the rest of the country. The federal government is expected to set mileage standards that are consistent with those requirements -- about 42.7 mpg by 2016 for cars and at least 26.6 mpg for light trucks.

The move will force automakers to average 35.5 mpg overall by 2016 -- four years ahead of a congressional deadline. But Congress is planning to offer automakers billions more to help them. A revised 942-page version of a climate change bill released late Monday doubles to $50 billion a program to offer low-cost retooling loans to automakers and parts producers.


It will also allow manufacturers to apply for government assistance for producing plug-in hybrids, and seek money to buy the expensive batteries that would be the heart of such vehicles. The bill creates new programs to aid electric vehicle production.

While the administration was not revealing details, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said the administration has attempted to balance the desire to raise mileage standards with the needs of the auto industry. "I think tomorrow you'll see people that are normally at odds with each other in agreement with each other," Gibbs said.

GM president and CEO Fritz Henderson and UAW President Ron Gettelfinger are among those auto executives who will be on hand Tuesday.

California and many other states have long sought to impose their own tailpipe emissions standards, but were stymied by the Bush administration, which refused to grant them a waiver under the Clean Air Act to do so. Automakers fought in court for years to block the standards and lobbied government officials to stop them.

The Obama regulation, which is backed by major automakers, will order the Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to work together to set the new tailpipe emissions limits and mileage standards. Top officials of Detroit's Big Three automakers, as well as Gov. Jennifer Granholm and California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, are expected to attend. Automakers will drop their lawsuits as part of the deal.

Officials said NHTSA and the EPA will work together to jointly issue regulations to ensure that both tailpipe emission and fuel economy regulations are harmonized. Automakers will also be able to push for credits toward meeting tailpipe emissions requirements -- as they currently have for fuel economy standards. The two agencies will also use NHTSA's "footprint" or attribute-based system to set tailpipe emissions requirements -- something California's rules didn't include.

California officials declared victory.

"The Obama administration has brought together the federal government, the state of California, and the auto industry behind new national automobile emissions standards that follow California's lead," said Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., chairwoman of the Senate Environment and Public Works committee. "This is good news for all of us who have fought long and hard to reduce global warming pollution, create clean energy jobs, and reduce our dangerous dependence on foreign oil."

Automakers get more flexibility to meet the yearly numbers -- and more leeway in the early years of compliance. Most importantly, this deal appears to prevent California and other states from setting higher state standards in the future.

The Obama administration has been reviewing California's request for three months. But the administration has been sympathetic to the concerns raised by automakers that two sets of standards would cause problems.

The deal may finally end a long-running dispute between California and Michigan.

Automakers have said state-by-state regulations would cost them tens of billions of dollars and fought California's efforts for years -- losing in three federal courts.

The United Auto Workers said in a letter to Congress on Monday that an announcement likely will come soon on emissions limits.

"The UAW understands the manager's amendment will delete the provisions directing the president to implement tougher efficiency standards for light-duty vehicles," said Alan Reuther, the UAW's legislative director. "We further understand that this change is being made because the Obama administration soon plans to move forward with a national, harmonized efficiency standard that will be supported by all stakeholders. This new standard will be significantly more stringent, thereby reducing oil consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks."

It's not clear whether the new tailpipe emissions regulations will take effect until the 2012 model year since NHTSA issued the 2011 fuel efficiency standards in March 30.

In April 2007, the Supreme Court granted the Environmental Protection Agency sweeping authority to regulate tailpipe emissions as a danger to human health. The EPA has proposed declaring tailpipe emissions as a threat to human health and was holding a public hearing today on the issue in Virginia.

Greenhouse gas emissions from cars, light trucks and other vehicles in 2006 accounted for nearly 24 percent of U.S. emissions with 94 percent of those emissions as carbon dioxide, according to the EPA. U.S. autos accounted for 4.3 percent of worldwide emissions.
 
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