Modern Camaro Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I figure my next undertaking will be a set of ported heads. And I will attempt to do the install myself. It looks simple enough. If I take my time I'm pretty sure it won't be too difficult. I will probably be sending my heads in for porting or doing a core exchange. And for now I am considering the PRC port job through TSP. If things go my way, I will probably be looking to do this sometime in 1-2 months. And hopefully the job won't take more than a day or two. Maybe three days tops depending on weather and work...and alcohol consumption. As always, any input from you guys is welcome and appreciated. I'll keep you all posted as I gain info and get closer to making a decision!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,590 Posts
sounds good, wish I could do that sort of stuff ... now for the uneducated, newbie question, While I have heard of ported heads forever, I never knew what they actually where or did ... what is the benefit of a ported head, what does it accomplish or how, generally, do they get you more power? TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
sounds good, wish I could do that sort of stuff ... now for the uneducated, newbie question, While I have heard of ported heads forever, I never knew what they actually where or did ... what is the benefit of a ported head, what does it accomplish or how, generally, do they get you more power? TIA
Hokie, seriously, you definitely can do that kind of work. It isn't as difficult as you might think. The first time I did any type of engine work I looked at the engine and I said to myself "hmm, all I really have to do is take a bolt off and then put it back". Lol, I mean it isn't that simple, but in a way it is. If you ever feel like you wanna start then simply get some hand tools and start. Go with something easy. Do a google search and make sure it isn't something that requires changing the gasket. Because some things have compressible gaskets that can only be used once. Like on my Mustang. Changing the intake manifold requires using a new gasket. Although I've gotten away with used gaskets before. But I would never attempt that on a head change. And even some exhaust flanges are compressible and one time use. If you take your time, go over everything, mark where stuff goes, take notes, and even take pictures, then you can definitely do these sort of things. There are people who have been building engines for decades that still take notes and pictures. Give it a shot one day.

As far as your question about heads. Simply put, more air more power. You're increasing the port size on the induction and exhaust side of the heads. Aftermarket heads are superior to ported heads because they have a different design that makes power differently. And they have better flow even throughout the head instead of just the inlet and outlet. Other heads like the Twisted Wedge have certain aspects other than increased flow that allow the air to move differently into the engine. And some have different combustion chamber sizes and different valve sizes. But basically, a ported head is just taking a stock head, strapping it to a machine, and making the ports where the intake manifold meets the head bigger...and making the ports where the header meets the head bigger as well. Some port companies also work the valves and alter the combustion chambers. Opening the combustion chambers will alter your compression ration if you retain the stock pistons. I believe these engines also benefit from polished ports which allow the air to flow smoother and faster. Some engines don't do well with polished heads...they benefit more from a more turbulent flow. Most companies flow test heads to see what makes their particular head actually flow better. So it isn't always about just opening up the ports. And then with different compression ration or different cam specs and even different displacement, some porting will be different than others.

I hope I explained all that clearly. Its one of those things where I have the information in my head but its difficult to explain properly. The stock LS family heads are great flowing heads. Which is why I have been looking at the cost of a ported LS3 head in comparison to a true aftermarket head. Because with heads as good as the LS3 (and L99) it gets harder for aftermarket companies to make a head that will over substantial gains and retain a decent price. Especially when you start porting LS3s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
what is the cfm numbers on a LS3 head?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,590 Posts
Hokie, seriously, you definitely can do that kind of work. It isn't as difficult as you might think. The first time I did any type of engine work I looked at the engine and I said to myself "hmm, all I really have to do is take a bolt off and then put it back". Lol, I mean it isn't that simple, but in a way it is. If you ever feel like you wanna start then simply get some hand tools and start. Go with something easy. Do a google search and make sure it isn't something that requires changing the gasket. Because some things have compressible gaskets that can only be used once. Like on my Mustang. Changing the intake manifold requires using a new gasket. Although I've gotten away with used gaskets before. But I would never attempt that on a head change. And even some exhaust flanges are compressible and one time use. If you take your time, go over everything, mark where stuff goes, take notes, and even take pictures, then you can definitely do these sort of things. There are people who have been building engines for decades that still take notes and pictures. Give it a shot one day.

As far as your question about heads. Simply put, more air more power. You're increasing the port size on the induction and exhaust side of the heads. Aftermarket heads are superior to ported heads because they have a different design that makes power differently. And they have better flow even throughout the head instead of just the inlet and outlet. Other heads like the Twisted Wedge have certain aspects other than increased flow that allow the air to move differently into the engine. And some have different combustion chamber sizes and different valve sizes. But basically, a ported head is just taking a stock head, strapping it to a machine, and making the ports where the intake manifold meets the head bigger...and making the ports where the header meets the head bigger as well. Some port companies also work the valves and alter the combustion chambers. Opening the combustion chambers will alter your compression ration if you retain the stock pistons. I believe these engines also benefit from polished ports which allow the air to flow smoother and faster. Some engines don't do well with polished heads...they benefit more from a more turbulent flow. Most companies flow test heads to see what makes their particular head actually flow better. So it isn't always about just opening up the ports. And then with different compression ration or different cam specs and even different displacement, some porting will be different than others.

I hope I explained all that clearly. Its one of those things where I have the information in my head but its difficult to explain properly. The stock LS family heads are great flowing heads. Which is why I have been looking at the cost of a ported LS3 head in comparison to a true aftermarket head. Because with heads as good as the LS3 (and L99) it gets harder for aftermarket companies to make a head that will over substantial gains and retain a decent price. Especially when you start porting LS3s.
I think I understand what you are saying and think it makes some sense ... if its not too much trouble when you get them, add some pictures of them to this post ... if I can put the words with the pictures, I think I've got it. Thanks for the rundown

I guess I am underestimating myself a little, but it is also a measure of time to do the normal everyday house things, work, finishing my basement, grandkids, just keeping the car clean, etc. On my 71 Nova way back when, I did the headers, air shocks, exhaust, and some carb changes (but, IIRC, I paid to have the manifold switched; mostly because I was scared of messing up the distributor, IIRC). Of course, cars were a bit simpler then and I was a teenager messing with a used $900 car, not a new $40K car as someone who knows he can sure mess things up. Since this is the first car I have had any interest in doing anything since that Nova, I figure I will work myself back in slowly. I'll do a CAI and a ported throttle body and then think about headers. From there, I'll have to do some evaluating. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
wow thats insane for stock numbers
Yea thats one thing about Chevy, they know how to make high flowing heads. I have a set of stage 2 ported Patriot Performance heads for my 2V SOHC 4.6 Ford engine in my Mustang. And those things flow nowhere near the stock LS heads. In fact, the Ford guys used to comment that Chevy LS1 heads flowed as much as aftermarket heads for even the pushrod Ford engines. The ported LS3 numbers might be in the graph I posted but you can see that ported aftermarket LS3 heads are straight up crazy and ported LS7 heads flow as much or maybe even more than aftermarket LS3s...I'm pretty sure thats what I saw. Our LS3s bone stock and untouched are good for 600-700 hp to the wheels!!

I think I understand what you are saying and think it makes some sense ... if its not too much trouble when you get them, add some pictures of them to this post ... if I can put the words with the pictures, I think I've got it. Thanks for the rundown

I guess I am underestimating myself a little, but it is also a measure of time to do the normal everyday house things, work, finishing my basement, grandkids, just keeping the car clean, etc. On my 71 Nova way back when, I did the headers, air shocks, exhaust, and some carb changes (but, IIRC, I paid to have the manifold switched; mostly because I was scared of messing up the distributor, IIRC). Of course, cars were a bit simpler then and I was a teenager messing with a used $900 car, not a new $40K car as someone who knows he can sure mess things up. Since this is the first car I have had any interest in doing anything since that Nova, I figure I will work myself back in slowly. I'll do a CAI and a ported throttle body and then think about headers. From there, I'll have to do some evaluating. Thanks again.
Yea life gets in the way, lol! I only mess around with my car because I can fall back on the Mustang and I have a flexible work schedule...and no wife, kids, or other adult responsibilities outside of paying bills. I will def post pics to show you. In the meantime I will post pics of the intake manifold ports to help you get a better idea and a visual of what I was saying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hokie, here is a pic of the bottom of the intake manifold. These are the ports that connect onto the cylinder head ports. These are rectangular port heads. When I got the ported intake manifold they opened the ports up larger (along with the inlet and some interior work). When I post the pics of the heads you will see the intake ports, the exhaust ports, and I'll include a shot of the combustion chambers. I would have posted a pic of all this back when I installed the ported intake but the glare from the sun prevented me from taking a decent shot and I didn't wanna wait until it got darker out.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,590 Posts
I didn't wanna wait until it got darker out.
I can understand that :lol: can't always stop progress for pics

and thanks for the first pic and the education process

I am so looking forward to retirement ... probably only 3365 days away :eek: and yes I have counted and it is on my calendar :lol:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top