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Hmmm...that production number doesn't seem right. I bought my Camaro two years ago and my VIN ends with 211070...making mine production #111070...so how could you buy a newly produced 2012 Camaro with a production number lower than my 2010? [URL="
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And here's a little info about VINs if anyone is interested...

Each character in a VIN has a specific meaning, and the VIN is broken up into sections. The first section identifies the manufacturer of the vehicle, and uses the first three digits:
-The first digit identifies the nation of origin. If the car was assembled from parts produced in different countries, this digit reflects the nation where the car was assembled. Some larger nations are split into regions. For example, cars built in Japan are assigned a J in the first digit. But cars made in the U.S. can have a 1, 4 or 5, depending on the region of its assembly.
-The second digit identifies the manufacturer of the vehicle. In the United States, the Society for Automotive Engineers issues manufacturer codes.
-The third digit identifies a division within the manufacturer or a general vehicle type. For example, the code for an American-made Ford is 1F, and depending on the type of vehicle, it may be a 1FA, 1FB and so on. A U.S. General Motors vehicle is a 1G. Chevrolet is a division of GM, so the first three digits for a Chevrolet are 1GC. (but our Camaros start with a 2 because they are manufactured in Canada, the G signifies GM and the 1 indicates a Chevrolet)

The next five digits, four through eight, describe the vehicle. The specific use of these digits differs from one manufacturer to another. Here is an example that includes common code elements:
-The fourth digit might contain a code that represents the vehicle's weight, horsepower or both.
-The fifth digit often identifies the platform of the vehicle, such as van, pickup truck, trailer, sedan, et cetera.
-The sixth digit can be a special code used by the manufacturer, or it might identify the specific model of the vehicle, such as Corvette, Durango or Mustang.
-The seventh digit can be used to identify body type, such as four-door, two-door, hatchback or convertible.
-The eighth digit is used for information about the engine, such as number of cylinders and engine displacement.
Digits four through eight might also be coded for information on the transmission used, the grade of the car (i.e., Accord LX, DX, Si), or other features such as safety belts and air bags.

The next three digits are consistent among all manufacturers:
-The ninth digit is always a check digit. The other digits in the VIN go through a series of calculations to obtain the correct check digit. This allows computers to tell immediately if there is an error in the VIN, which often happens when someone transcribes a VIN or enters it into a computer.
-The model year digit is the tenth digit. Each year has a code character. From the 1980s until 2000, each year had a letter code, with 2000 assigned Y. 2001 was given code 1, 2002 is code 2, and so forth.
-The eleventh digit is the plant code, representing the factory where the car was assembled.

The last six digits, 12 through 17, are production sequence numbers, although small manufacturers that make fewer than 500 cars per year use the 12th, 13th and 14th digits as additional manufacturer identification codes. Production sequence numbers identify the vehicle itself, sort of like a serial number.
Since each manufacturer has a different code, and each car produced by the same factory has its own production sequence number, every car produced in a given year has a unique VIN.
The European Union has a similar regulation for VINs, but it is less stringent than the North American rule. European VINs are not required to include year, factory or vehicle attribute data. However, the two systems are compatible. While most countries have some form of VIN system that is compatible with the North American system, cars that are imported must have their VIN number entered into the MVR database along with enough information to explain what the codes are if the original VIN system differs from the ISO 3779 standard.

CALCULATING THE CHECK DIGIT

The check digit for a VIN is obtained through a number of mathematical steps. Each letter used in a VIN has a corresponding number value, while numbers stay the same. Therefore, the VIN becomes a string of 17 numbers (with a space in the ninth position, where the check digit goes). Each position in the VIN has a weight -- the number of times that digit is multiplied.
For example, the weight of position one is eight. A computer multiplies the number in position one is by 8. Then it multiplies all 16 numbers by the appropriate weight for their position in the VIN, adds the results together and divides that result by 11. The remainder becomes the check digit. If the remainder is 10, the check digit is X.
 

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Hmmm...that production number doesn't seem right. I bought my Camaro two years ago and my VIN ends with 211070...making mine production #111070...so how could you buy a newly produced 2012 Camaro with a production number lower than my 2010?
With each model year, the VIN sequence resets. So it's VERY likely that can happen.
 

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With each model year, the VIN sequence resets. So it's VERY likely that can happen.
Thanks El...now I understand. Since the '09s and '10s were all technically the same production year...they didn't reset the sequence but they did in '11 and '12.

Can we just call this another blonde moment? :D
 

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Thanks El...now I understand. Since the '09s and '10s were all technically the same production year...they didn't reset the sequence but they did in '11 and '12.

Can we just call this another blonde moment? :D
Or even a greener moment,, there was no 09, they started as 2010
 

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Bully Proof
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In your case, we'll just call it a "green" moment. :)
There's nothing wrong with being a Greenhorn...lol. :D You gotta start somewhere.


Or even a greener moment,, there was no 09, they started as 2010
Yes I am aware that there is no 2009 Camaro...I just said they were the same production year...but they did sell the 2010 very early in '09 before other 2010 models were released which explains why the production number ran so high for a single model year. That's why I thought that they just kept going since the model year is already indicated in the VIN.
 

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There's nothing wrong with being a Greenhorn...lol. :D You gotta start somewhere.
Actually I was referring to your car's color, not your experience level. I was just poking at you in jest. ;)
 

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Actually I was referring to your car's color, not your experience level. I was just poking at you in jest. ;)
I knew that and I thought it was funny! :D But the truth of the matter is that I am a newb in the car world with less than 2 years of knowledge and experience...so I do make mistakes. At least I learn something every time I make one. :thumbsup:

2012's will be a bit more difficult to figure out since the line is shared with the new Buick Regal.
Just curious...what does that have to do with the numbering sequence used on the 2012 Camaro VINs? [URL="
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Just curious...what does that have to do with the numbering sequence used on the 2012 Camaro VINs?
Envy, I'm not 100% sure what they do now with multi-line cars, but in the OLD days, like in Lansing, MI, they would make Olds Cutlasses and Buick Regals on the same assembly line. They each had VIN specifics besides the last 6 sequential numbers, but they ALSO delineated a break in sequence numbers for the different brand of cars. For example, the Oldsmobiles might be assigned sequential VINs starting with 3xxxxx and the Buicks would start with 1xxxxx. Can't recall exactly what numbers went where, but you get the idea. So the VIN sequence would still be able to follow the brand. So two buicks rolling down the line, with an Olds in between, would still be VIN sequential in the 1 series it was assigned and only be one digit off on the sequential number VIN100002 [Buick], VIN300018 [Olds], then VIN100003 [Buick]. (hope that made sense)

They may not do that anymore, as I haven't really followed GM's VIN sequencing system any longer. But from what I understand, they're giving the ZL1s their own sequencing numbers, so anything's possilble.
 

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First number designated brand. 1-chevy, 2-Pontiac, 3-olds, 4-Buick, 5-gmc truck, 6-caddy. The next was a letter that stood for model (camaro, firebird, chevelle etc..) so basically every character meant something.
 

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Oh that was cars back in the pre 80s. Later they added 2 numbers in front that designated us built , Canada, Japan, and second being isuzu, gm. Somewhere after the 90s I gave up on vins.
 
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