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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For 5th Gen Camaro just a little makes a big improvement.
BMR SFC 015 Butterfly style sub frame connectors and DTB 004 Tunnel Brace.
Especially now that these 1010-2015 are getting older, tightening up things makes sense for quieting down the rattles but a bigger improvement in braking and handling.
For the true believers:
Spohn C10 996 adjustable K-frame brace.
and Not a Camaro part # but it fits and it works: BMR STB 012. Reinforces the front strut tower 6" below where a STB would mount. Greatly improves the steering feel, makes
it more precice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I know it's confusing because of how BMR identified the STB 012 and originally sold it for the 08 G8, a short wheelbase Commodore. The Holden Engineering Report documented that many Holden cars from the early years to present all have the same structural defect in the strut towers. Monaro, Stateman and Commodore had cracking and bending visable in the towers, all ~6" below the top of the tower, years after they were first built. Many customers complained to Holden of imprecise steering as the cars got older too. For Holden's year 2000 Report they had benchmarked the BMW M5 and 7 series and expected similar steering feel but didn't get it. In the 2000 Report they discovered that oem the towers had "frame frex" which soon became obvious as "metal fatique". The brace BMR eventually copied was Holdens fix but Holden never made it before they started failing as a business. So the STB 012 isn't a strut tower brace in the conventional sense. It's the "frame flex" fix from Holden.
I did not recommend the Camaro STB you picture from BMR because it is not adjustable. The Whiteline is and the pre load it makes possible makes the strut tower stronger than a non adj STB.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Hood
this is the Spohn K-frame brace. This one is a non adjustable on the 04 GTO. The adj just has the twin adjuster nuts in the middle of the brace. Same adjustable's are on 2014 Caprice's and the Camaro and the G8.
 

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You really do NOT want an adjustable strut tower bar. Too many people end up pulling too tight, and warping their aprons.
Buy one made for the car, and bolt it down, and be done with it. Adjustable will not end up well for anyone if they keep
tweaking it after it's been bolted down. You only have to adjust it so the bolt holes line up, then tighten. Well, since
they cost a little more, you are better off with the solid one made for the car.

Once you set and tighten the adjustable down, and you feel like you want to pull harder, that pull is not distributed
evenly over both towers. If one side has already been weakened, or stressed, it will pull in before the other side does.
You will also knock your camber out pulling on the towers, and since one side will not pull in the same as the other, one
side would be out, one more than the other.

IF you think, well, the bolt holes do not quite line up with the solid brace, so I have to buy the adjustable one? If the
bolt holes do not line up with one MADE for your car, then one of the aprons has already flexed too far. Or,
If you bolt one side down, and the other end is raised up a little, same thing, one side hit too many bumps
and potholes and pushed the apron up on that side. The older the car is, the worse fitment will be with a
once piece bar.

If you are going to spend the money, then buy the one that also bolts to the firewall. A strut brace, while it ties the
towers together, they still flex, just less as a pair. Bolting the brace to the firewall prevents them from moving at all.

A strut brace won't prevent up and down flex, only side to side. No matter which way you go, you should notice
the difference in turns. I don't have one on my Camaro, and I still don't get much body roll as it is.

I got my Mustang tied up so good, and with better swaybars, I get almost no body roll in turns. None at all
in turns at 45MPH and under. I got a lot of over-steer too, with the upper and lower brace, and thicker swaybars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You really do NOT want an adjustable strut tower bar. Too many people end up pulling too tight, and warping their aprons.
Buy one made for the car, and bolt it down, and be done with it. Adjustable will not end up well for anyone if they keep
tweaking it after it's been bolted down. You only have to adjust it so the bolt holes line up, then tighten. Well, since
they cost a little more, you are better off with the solid one made for the car.

Of course, optimal performance requires discipline. The "a little is good so a lot is better" inclination serves no one well.
Pre-loading is not twisting the Hell out of the body. Do it once, do it right.

Once you set and tighten the adjustable down, and you feel like you want to pull harder, that pull is not distributed
evenly over both towers. If one side has already been weakened, or stressed, it will pull in before the other side does.
You will also knock your camber out pulling on the towers, and since one side will not pull in the same as the other, one
side would be out, one more than the other.

See above and accept that discipline is your friend.

IF you think, well, the bolt holes do not quite line up with the solid brace, so I have to buy the adjustable one? If the
bolt holes do not line up with one MADE for your car, then one of the aprons has already flexed too far. Or,
If you bolt one side down, and the other end is raised up a little, same thing, one side hit too many bumps
and potholes and pushed the apron up on that side. The older the car is, the worse fitment will be with a
once piece bar.

This is why frame machines are your friend. Pay for an hour or two to get the car level, plumb and square, then
brace the chassis.

If you are going to spend the money, then buy the one that also bolts to the firewall. A strut brace, while it ties the
towers together, they still flex, just less as a pair. Bolting the brace to the firewall prevents them from moving at all.

The pair in the picture does more. The firewall is weak.

A strut brace won't prevent up and down flex, only side to side. No matter which way you go, you should notice
the difference in turns. I don't have one on my Camaro, and I still don't get much body roll as it is.

I got my Mustang tied up so good, and with better swaybars, I get almost no body roll in turns. None at all
in turns at 45MPH and under. I got a lot of over-steer too, with the upper and lower brace, and thicker swaybars.
lots of oversteer is fun but not ideal for the street. Neutral is optimal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A strut brace won't prevent up and down flex, only side to side. No matter which way you go, you should notice
the difference in turns. I don't have one on my Camaro, and I still don't get much body roll as it is.
The braces are not for reducung body roll. You write "don't have one on my Camaro, still don't get much body roll as it is." That's because it's the springs, bushings, sway bars and even the shocks that determine how much body roll the suspension produces. The braces are to reduce the spring rate of the unibody/sub frame. Tiny movements there make the steering imprecise, play poorly with the camber, decrease the amount of time before the rattles get nasty. The braces prove that you can't have the chassis too stiff (see McLaren). If the physics allowed. infinite stiffness of a chassis would be fine. Suspensions are easy to make too stiff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A strut brace won't prevent up and down flex, only side to side.
The up+down flex is what the BMR 012 prevents. How? Because it has the option of being welded to the top of the sub frame. Bolting only is never as strong as welding. Bolt in sub frame connectors provide a great opportunity to prove this. Like the BMR 013. Once installed, drive around for a week, get a good feel for how much tighter the chassis feels. (NOT the suspension) Then weld them in at various points along the SFC. You will notice a big improvement, the whole car feels more 'all of a piece", more like a Bentley (exaggeration) or a 911 (exaggeration also).
 

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Reacher: You're confusing the strut tower brace and rear sub-frame brace. There is nothing you can do to keep the APRONS from flexing up and down, unless you get the brace the bolts to the firewall to reduce it. There are two different subjects going on here, and I am not talking about REAR anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Reacher: You're confusing the strut tower brace and rear sub-frame brace.
What is a rear sub-frame brace?
Please quote where I reference "rear sub-frame brace"
Please quote where I reference "rear" anything.
BMR once called their chassis brace a sub frame connector, which it is on the front sub frame. Welded to both sides.
Now they call it STB 012 and we all read that as a front strut tower brace, and it is not. It is a front sub frame connector.
You wrote:
"Reacher: You're confusing the strut tower brace and rear sub-frame brace."
I honestly do not know what that means
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This is a Camaro APRON:
Genuine GM Front Driver Side Wheelhouse Panel 22882807 | eBay
What does this have to do with my posts?
. There is nothing you can do to keep the APRONS from flexing up and down, unless you get the brace the bolts to the firewall to reduce it.
I'm confused? How could bracing the firewall to the strut towers have any effect on the APRONS?
Please quote me on claiming anything about APRONS.
As to the firewall, it is useless for reinforcing a STB because it flexes and it's the windshield frame that has to be strong enough to keep the windshield in place. The 3rd + 4th gen F-body cars had an after market strut tower brace that required drilling a 3/4" hole through the windshield frame for an HD attachment point. It looked like it attached to the firewall but it didn't. Bolted in and then welded, to the frame of the windshield. I recall the torque spec was 100 lbs.
This is my 98 Camaro, deleted back seat for my welded roll bar to the fabricated frame that I installed that aftermarket 3 point STB. The frame is welded to 12 points along the body, triangulated to the tunnel brace. The only bolt in so it can be easily removed for exhaust, transmission and such Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Water
Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Grille Bumper
Tire Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle
Automotive tire Hood Wood Bumper Automotive exterior
 

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Wow... You haven't read anything you wrote? You wrote about an adjustable strut brace, which is where it all started.

Whatever, apparently over explaining tings fries brain cells...

Well, I guess that again, I am ~Done...
 
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