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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2010 2SS M6
Mods: Bolt ons (PTB, step colder spark plugs, 160 degree thermo, CAI, LTH with high flow cats, tuned)

Talking with my local shop IPS in Ohio. Started talking cams. THey gave me a price range of 3k oout the door for the Livernois cam kit being cam, springs, rods, oil pump and timing chain etc (going from memory).

Usage: mainly street driver with occasional 1/4 mile track

What thinks ye? Good deal or no? Good manufacture to go with?

Link to possible cams:

http://store.ipsmotorsports.net/camaro/2010-camaro-ss/engine-107/engine-lower-2/cams-2.html
 

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Why are you running one step colder plugs? And is that price for the cam kit including install and tuning? Because a lot of places are offering those kits with install and tuning for less than that.
 

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What are the cam specs? Is it an off the shelf cam or a custom one? And again, why are you running plugs that are 1 step colder? Just curious...
 

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What are the cam specs? Is it an off the shelf cam or a custom one? And again, why are you running plugs that are 1 step colder? Just curious...
what does "one step colder" mean and / or do? I never heard of that
 

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what does "one step colder" mean and / or do? I never heard of that
I've only seen people use plugs that were one step colder than stock on engines built with much higher than stock compression or with high boost or both. I had to run plugs that were on step colder on my Mustang a few years ago when I had an engine with a compression ratio was over 12:1. I think I was closer to 13:1. It helps prevent harmful detonation due to higher compression/boost making more heat. A colder plug will remove more heat. Some will go one step colder per every X amount of hp. I was just wondering why OP went colder. Not to criticize and not to say that he shouldn't have...just wondering.
 

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I've only seen people use plugs that were one step colder than stock on engines built with much higher than stock compression or with high boost or both. I had to run plugs that were on step colder on my Mustang a few years ago when I had an engine with a compression ratio was over 12:1. I think I was closer to 13:1. It helps prevent harmful detonation due to higher compression/boost making more heat. A colder plug will remove more heat. Some will go one step colder per every X amount of hp. I was just wondering why OP went colder. Not to criticize and not to say that he shouldn't have...just wondering.
thanks, that's part of what I was looking for... but what is a one step colder plug? Not that I want one, but I mean how would I know what to buy; how do you identify one?
 

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You would have to go to a speed shop to get them or you can call NGK or whichever brand plugs you want and ask for them. Basically, just match up the part numbers and there you go. I don't know of any other way of looking at them or testing them to be sure. If you order them tho, the company will send you the right one. Sometimes the supercharger or turbocharger you buy will recommend plugs. Or even some aftermarket heads will recommend plugs. And those plugs will probably be a step colder.
 

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Got it, thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I run them out of force of habit. I come from a long line of 4 bangers. Not really needed in my current setup. Now if it was SC I most likely would.
 

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on a tuned and exhaust car what are your thoughts on cold plugs vs hot plugs?
 

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on a tuned and exhaust car what are your thoughts on cold plugs vs hot plugs?
OEM plugs or direct replacement plugs are just fine. You won't need a step colder until you go forced induction or build an engine with higher than stock compression and add a cam. For now, and even if you added every available bolt-on, there is no need to go with colder plugs. And you definitely do not wanna get hotter plugs. That is just asking for trouble.
 

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OEM plugs or direct replacement plugs are just fine. You won't need a step colder until you go forced induction or build an engine with higher than stock compression and add a cam. For now, and even if you added every available bolt-on, there is no need to go with colder plugs. And you definitely do not wanna get hotter plugs. That is just asking for trouble.
I see, heard the original plugs should be good for awhile?
 

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Yeah, they should.

When you go with a colder plug on an engine that can't keep them hot enough then they will get soot on them faster and you will need to change them more often.

When I had my Saturn up over 18psi I had to run 3 steps colder. I even had a set of 4 steps colder in my tool box just in case. Up to 18psi I was ok with two steps colder. At about 5-6 psi I could get away with one step colder, but that didn't last long.

When I dyno'd the car it was fine until I was past 18psi on the 2 step colder plugs. I had turned the boost up and lost about 50whp right off the get go from when it was at 15psi. I tried to add fuel and retard timing and nothing helped. I put in a set of plugs that was a total of 3 colder and it immediately picked up about 80whp. I added the timing back in and leaned it out to a safe point and that added about 30more whp on top of the 80 just by changing the plugs.

With NGK the numbers count up the colder you go, every other plug manufacture goes down.
Ex. NGK bkr5es is the stock DOHC Saturn 1.9l plug. 2 step colder is bkr7e.
With an autlite the PN is 3924, two steps colder is a 3922.

On the colder plugs the ground strap get shorter and the center electrode gets closer to the thread rim of the plug. This allow the heat to transfer into the thread rim (and this into the head) faster. If the plug is too hot in heat range then it will stay hot light a glow plug and will ignite the charge air/fuel on the compression stock before the spark event occurs, (thus causing pre-ignition).

You can feel it happening...its almost like a bad misfire when you are "gettin' it done."
 

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Yeah, they should.

When you go with a colder plug on an engine that can't keep them hot enough then they will get soot on them faster and you will need to change them more often.

When I had my Saturn up over 18psi I had to run 3 steps colder. I even had a set of 4 steps colder in my tool box just in case. Up to 18psi I was ok with two steps colder. At about 5-6 psi I could get away with one step colder, but that didn't last long.

When I dyno'd the car it was fine until I was past 18psi on the 2 step colder plugs. I had turned the boost up and lost about 50whp right off the get go from when it was at 15psi. I tried to add fuel and retard timing and nothing helped. I put in a set of plugs that was a total of 3 colder and it immediately picked up about 80whp. I added the timing back in and leaned it out to a safe point and that added about 30more whp on top of the 80 just by changing the plugs.

With NGK the numbers count up the colder you go, every other plug manufacture goes down.
Ex. NGK bkr5es is the stock DOHC Saturn 1.9l plug. 2 step colder is bkr7e.
With an autlite the PN is 3924, two steps colder is a 3922.

On the colder plugs the ground strap get shorter and the center electrode gets closer to the thread rim of the plug. This allow the heat to transfer into the thread rim (and this into the head) faster. If the plug is too hot in heat range then it will stay hot light a glow plug and will ignite the charge air/fuel on the compression stock before the spark event occurs, (thus causing pre-ignition).

You can feel it happening...its almost like a bad misfire when you are "gettin' it done."
thanks man!!
 
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