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According to a report on Mustang Blog, 3 teens have managed to horribly wreck a 2010 Ford Mustang GT. Apparently the teens were given the keys to the car for a test drive and during the run, they crashed it. Looking at the speedometer picture, it seems they were doing at least 100mph before they got into the mishap. Now here’s the amazing part. None of them were wearing seat belts, resulting in them being flung out of the car. Now you would think this is an instant death, but no! They actually survived with only a few minor scratches.

Looking at the cabin, you can see it is still pretty much intact and has proven its worth according to safety standard boards. The car was given the Five Star Safety Rating award, and this incident seems to prove it. Even though this story is still unconfirmed, the evidence adds up and the story checks out.


http://www.carthusiast.com/three-teens-wreck-2010-mustang-gt-on-test-drive-528.html

I wonder what they hit.
 

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You can't go by what the speedo says. It could be on anything at this point. If the wheels come off the ground it could easily max out if something sticks the throttle on the engine.
 

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Speculating that they would have lived had they worn belts and stayed in the cabin is absurd. I was an EMT for years - I've seen cars less crashed than this that were fatal. You never know with the many injuries that can happen, such as a head injury.

I would NOT have wanted to be in that car, belted or not.
 

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Well if you break it you buy it.... That thing is just completely totaled... Seat Belt or not there would be injuries either way with that wreck
 

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This is another reason I ordered my car and why I wouldnt want one off the dealership lot. I dont want some wise ass driving my car like this before I buy it.
 

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Wow. I wonder if there is more to that story, I don't know of any dealership that would let three teens test drive a car like that without a salesman present.

Regading the speed, I've said for years, all vehicles should really have a 'black box' like airplanes that captures EVERYTHING from speed, rpm, accelerator/brake usage, all of it.

Regarding them surviving without seatbelts, they are VERY lucky and that is VERY rare. I'll still wear mine every time. :cool:
 

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Wow. I wonder if there is more to that story, I don't know of any dealership that would let three teens test drive a car like that without a salesman present.

Regading the speed, I've said for years, all vehicles should really have a 'black box' like airplanes that captures EVERYTHING from speed, rpm, accelerator/brake usage, all of it.

Regarding them surviving without seatbelts, they are VERY lucky and that is VERY rare. I'll still wear mine every time. :cool:
True that. I'm still wondering why they let me at 20 test drive cars when I was in the market.

And that black box idea is pretty cool. I never even really thought about that.
 

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Wow. I wonder if there is more to that story, I don't know of any dealership that would let three teens test drive a car like that without a salesman present.

Regading the speed, I've said for years, all vehicles should really have a 'black box' like airplanes that captures EVERYTHING from speed, rpm, accelerator/brake usage, all of it.

Regarding them surviving without seatbelts, they are VERY lucky and that is VERY rare. I'll still wear mine every time. :cool:
I sure as hell wouldn't want a box in my car recording everything I do with it.
If I did have one it would be one of the first things disconnected and removed. ;)



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Talking about Onstar?
Nope and you do have one and so do I. My 98 Camaro doesn't though.

According to General Motors, if your GM vehicle has an airbag, chances are you have an event data recorder. According to GM, "virtually all GM vehicles from '98 on have event data recorders." All 2005 models and future GM vehicles have them.

http://www.fox16.com/news/local/story/Many-cars-have-a-black-box/TtSlnW_tS0KZzHW7-J5RzA.cspx

Also, I don't think it's easily removed. I think its wired into your air bag system.

Looks like this:


http://mfes.com/cdr.html

General Motors Pre-crash
The data for essentially all pre-2000 GM cars contained no pre-crash data, but include driver's seatbelt status (buckled/unbuckled), some airbag system diagnostic information, and the crash pulse. The 2000 and newer cars generally include those things along with the vehicle speed, brake status (ON/OFF), throttle position, and engine RPM for about 5 seconds prior to impact. Though there are exceptions to both of these generalizations.

General Motors Post-crash
SDMs record the calculated post-impact delta-V, and report it in 10ms intervals for up to 300ms in some modules, less in others. Seatbelt switch status (buckled/unbuckled), airbag warning lamp condition, key cycles at deployment, key cycles at investigation, deployment command times, and some other parameters may also be recorded, depending on the module type & manufacturer used in that vehicle.

What data is probably available in a vehicle of interest varies by vehicle model and year. The Vetronix website used to have a list of what you could generally expect from each vehicle, but that list seems to have gone away with the Bosch takeover. Your best bet to learn what data you might get from a specific vehicle is to contact someone who has the system and ask them to check the HELP file in their software. Also when you get a file READ THE DATA LIMITATIONS section of the report. It details the idiosyncrasies of that particular module. It is the ‘must read” part of any report.

Some of the newer Epsilon-class cars may also have information regarding steering wheel position, ABS activation, both Throttle Plate position and Throttle Pedal Position, and more.

Some GM SDM Nuances

Hint: READ THE DATA LIMITITATIONS in a download report.
SDMs can store two types of events: Deployment events (which can not be overwritten) and Non-Deployment events which can be overwritten, or will be erased after 250 (or so) ignition key-cycles are recorded.
Years ago, Non-Deployments were called “near-deployments” which was found to convey the incorrect sense to some people that the bag was “about to deploy,” this is completely wrong, and the terminology was changed to avoid some of those problems. Some of us still inadvertently use the old term sometimes, though.
The SPEED recorded by the module is the speedometer indicated vehicle speed, not the OVER THE GROUND SPEED. This can be an important distinction particularly during non-ABS skidding (where the speed reads ZERO regardless of how fast the car is moving) and occasions when the wheels may have been airborne or on very slippery surfaces while either the throttle or brake were applied. It also important to remember that wheel slip induced by hard ABS braking or yawing events can cause the indicated speed to be different from the actual speed.
Many modules record the number of keycycles or ignition cycles the car has experienced at the time an event is recorded. One keycycle is recorded each time the module is powered up for a few seconds (long enough to perform its self test). See the Sunfire/Deer example below for an example of this data: The module was downloaded three ignition key cycles after the event (from 10,170 to 10,173).
If the module is left in the car after a deployment, even though the SRS-light may remain on after repairs are made, it will probably try to fire the bags if involved in another accident.
There are several different suppliers for these modules, and sometimes units from different manufacturers record different data.
A very few modules have 1024 bytes of EEPROM memory instead of the more common 512 Bytes. These can actually hold up to 3 events, including the SDM A/B/E (95/96 Lumina and Olds) and S (95 Saturn) as well as the 96/97-ish Cadillac SDM-CL2. None have pre-crash, but have similar data to the SDM-R series, i.e. delta-v, seatbelt, SIR light, etc...
Data buffering issues can sometimes leave odd-looking post-crash information in a file. This is most commonly seen in cases where the crash pulse was really long.
Newer cars on the Epsilon platform using the CAN-bus can only be downloaded with the newer blue-colored CDR box with the newer software, and sometimes offers a bunch of additional interesting (and a lot of uninteresting) information with regard to vehicle status before and during a crash
For several years now, modules have reported an "algorithm adjusted Delta-V" instead of simply "Delta-V". The software essentially has a running re-zero operation to account for rough road operation (such as on dirt roads) when trying to determine when airbags must fire. During really long pulses, some researchers have shown this to have a measurable effect on total reported delta-vee.
With newer systems that have a bunch of available options, How does one determine if it is "equiped"? The answer is that generally it IS equipped with that option if that data slot contains a number or zero (anything other than N/A); If there's an N/A, then we need to check the Engineering Translation Report (ETR) for further information. Sometimes we have to actually go look at the car with a Tech-2 or MasterTech in hand in order to be sure.
The new ACMs wake up with acceleration pulses from any direction (not just rearward as with older units), and begin to run the algorithm to determine if it's a Non-Deploy or a Deploy event.
Malibu CLASSIC and Malibu (MAXX) are different animals: The Classic (4th vin digit=N) has long been supported while the newer GMX380 platform (4th vin digit=Z) is a CAN-bus vehicle requiring the ver 2.8 or newer hardware to access.
Chevrolet (in partnership with Suzuki) builds Aveo, Optra, and Epica models, as well as the Pontiac Wave which are rebadged Daewoos (after Daewoo went bankrupt in 1999). All of these have Siemens brand ACMs, which are not supported by the CDR system.
One last item: READ THE DATA LIMITATIONS that come with a report.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
100 mph, no seat belts and no deaths, sounds more like a myth to me... not that i want the teens to die, but it doesnt sound right
Maybe the were flung into grass or something? Pictures don't lie, they had to of have something hard, in which they would be have to be really speeding.
 

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Speculating that they would have lived had they worn belts and stayed in the cabin is absurd. I was an EMT for years - I've seen cars less crashed than this that were fatal. You never know with the many injuries that can happen, such as a head injury.

I would NOT have wanted to be in that car, belted or not.
Having worked in an ER for a few decades I know you can end up in a wheelchair or bed for the rest of your life just from a relatively minor crash.. This happens because of a high performance car with a low performance driver....
 

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