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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey,

I had a catback on my last car with larger diameter stainless steel pipes and a high-flow muffler that I bought to replace the factory catback for a little more power and better sound. I've always assumed that a true dual exhaust (2 separate pipes coming off each set of headers terminating with 2 separate high-flow mufflers had less power-loss than a catback (= "more" power), but the stuff I've read lately seems to suggest otherwise.

Do you actually get more power with a good catback as opposed to a good dual exhaust? If so, is that because there are 2 mufflers versus one, and furthermore if true, why would the Camaro team design the factory exhaust as dual (dual muffler & cats)?

TIA
 

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You are aware that the new Camaro has a dual exhaust with two cats, a crossover and two mufflers, right?

I think maybe you are visualizing the term "catback" to reflect a 4th-gen-type exhaust with the aggregated muffler that was dictated by design constraints. "Catback (or "cat-back") really just refers to that portion of the exhaust that is downstream of the catalytic converter(s) -- everything from the cat back (hence the name...)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You are aware that the new Camaro has a dual exhaust with two cats, a crossover and two mufflers, right?

I think maybe you are visualizing the term "catback" to reflect a 4th-gen-type exhaust with the aggregated muffler that was dictated by design constraints. "Catback (or "cat-back") really just refers to that portion of the exhaust that is downstream of the catalytic converter(s) -- everything from the cat back (hence the name...)
I knew that. I'm asking why they went with the two cats, a crossover and two mufflers. Was it because that gives better performance than catback? I'm looking for an answer to my question btw.
 

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I knew that. I'm asking why they went with the two cats, a crossover and two mufflers. Was it because that gives better performance than catback? I'm looking for an answer to my question btw.
What do you mean by the word "catback"? Do you mean somethng like the 2-into-one design like the 4th gen had? The crossover, 2 mufflers, tips, assorted pipes, etc. on the new Camaro ARE a "catback".
 

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You're referring to a Y-pipe style exhaust as compared to true dual exhaust. The y-pipe design exhaust was used in 3rd and 4th gens due to the fact the the rear suspension was a torque arm style 3-link. Since the torque arm ran down one side of the driveshaft, a single intermediate pipe with a traverse mounted muffler was used. The downside to the y-pipe style is that you need a larger intermediate pipe to flow the same amount of air as true duals since that one pipe has to move the exhaust from both sides of the engine as opposed to 1 bank as the true duals does. Also now with the more frequent use of the x-pipe, it can be placed at the optimum location to maximize scavaging, creating more power. The H-pipe used on old school style true duals was really just for reducing pulses through the exhaust.
 

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gto, I'm sure you and I are on the same page when I ask weland for clarification of what he's asking.:confused:

Two headers into two cats connected to an x-pipe and then into two mufflers finally exiting two resonators.

A cat back system designed for the above mentioned system would merely replace the section after the cats.....hence the term cat back. If your question is 'which is more efficient at expelling spent exhaust gas', then the true dual would be it.
 

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You're referring to a Y-pipe style exhaust as compared to true dual exhaust. The y-pipe design exhaust was used in 3rd and 4th gens due to the fact the the rear suspension was a torque arm style 3-link. Since the torque arm ran down one side of the driveshaft, a single intermediate pipe with a traverse mounted muffler was used. The downside to the y-pipe style is that you need a larger intermediate pipe to flow the same amount of air as true duals since that one pipe has to move the exhaust from both sides of the engine as opposed to 1 bank as the true duals does. Also now with the more frequent use of the x-pipe, it can be placed at the optimum location to maximize scavaging, creating more power. The H-pipe used on old school style true duals was really just for reducing pulses through the exhaust.

:agree: 100%
 

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gto, I'm sure you and I are on the same page when I ask weland for clarification of what he's asking.:confused:

Two headers into two cats connected to an x-pipe and then into two mufflers finally exiting two resonators.

A cat back system designed for the above mentioned system would merely replace the section after the cats.....hence the term cat back. If your question is 'which is more efficient at expelling spent exhaust gas', then the true dual would be it.
Ah! Yes, I forgot the resonators...
 

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speaking of exhaust... when the hell is SLP gonna have the stuff for the 2010 Camaro on their site?!?!?! i know they're gonna offer stuff. i wanna order a loudmouth for the new Camaro and i can't yet. d'oh! i know, i'm impatient... but i keep checking their site looking for an update and all this excitement has me going a little crazy. :lol:
 

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I knew that. I'm asking why they went with the two cats, a crossover and two mufflers. Was it because that gives better performance than catback? I'm looking for an answer to my question btw.
The air in a single exhaust configuration is more restrictive then a dual exhaust. The single exhaust flows air from all 8 cylinders into one pipe, all the air trying to leave the vehicle have to compete for the same space. One the other hand, a true dual exhaust allows for the exhaust from just 4 cylinders of the engine to flow through 1 catalytic converter, muffler, and what ever else they throw in there, while the other 4 cylinders have a second pipe with it own catalytic converter, muffler, etc. So, a true dual exhaust is better then just upgrading a single exhaust with a cat back system.
While installing a “Cat back” on a single exhaust provides more power, you still are faced with the fact that all 8 cylinders are pushing exhaust out just 1 catalytic converter.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The air in a single exhaust configuration is more restrictive then a dual exhaust. The single exhaust flows air from all 8 cylinders into one pipe, all the air trying to leave the vehicle have to compete for the same space. One the other hand, a true dual exhaust allows for the exhaust from just 4 cylinders of the engine to flow through 1 catalytic converter, muffler, and what ever else they throw in there, while the other 4 cylinders have a second pipe with it own catalytic converter, muffler, etc. So, a true dual exhaust is better then just upgrading a single exhaust with a cat back system.
While installing a “Cat back” on a single exhaust provides more power, you still are faced with the fact that all 8 cylinders are pushing exhaust out just 1 catalytic converter.
Thanks. I was speaking from my experience with 4th-gens, where everything was a Y pipe behind the 1 cat. I meant to suggest something different than the factory setup... oh well I got my answer, so thanks to you and those who tried to help. The rest of you can go back to your studies at Wyotech :poke::D
 
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